Save Silver Hallmarks!

The ‘Red Tape Challenge’ launched by the government on the 7th April is designed to remove any superfluous rules that make commerce more difficult than it should be.

Online PR News – 05-June-2011 – – The ‘Red Tape Challenge’ launched by the government on the 7th April is designed to remove any superfluous rules that make commerce more difficult than it should be. One of the particular regulations which is being challenged is the need for all precious metals to be tested independently for adequate metal content. This is the process we know as hallmarking, the logo for which currently displays a leopard’s head.

Having recently been countered by the Birmingham and London Assay Offices, the challenge recently prompted an appeal on the Government Red Tape Challenge Site where people were urged to make their objections known. At present, a whopping 5,984 comments have been left on this topic massively exceeding the amount left relating to altering the Sunday Trading laws.

The independent hallmarking of precious metals carried out by the Assay offices can actually promote enterprise and industry due to the fact it guarantees a consistent level of excellent quality gold and silver objects. A present day Silversmith would produce a piece of silver, perhaps a vase or cutlery set, before submitting it to assayed. In doing so, the purchaser is guaranteed silver of the required 92.5% proof of sterling silver quality which cannot be confused with inferior silver, silver plate, chrome nickel or any other base metal.

Hallmarking is a 700 year old institution and is the oldest form of consumer protection the UK. The information this process provides the consumer is quite literally the envy of the world; without it an entirely unfair responsibility would fall on the consumer forcing them to solely judge whether an item is of quality.

The Hallmarking Act 1973 protects trade and consumers, hence the onslaught on opposing comments requesting the new proposals are scrapped leaving hallmarking regulations as they are. The abolition of Hallmarking/a> would allow the introduction of new, low-cost, jewellery metals to the UK market. Unless these are regulated, these metals would end up competing with the established, high-quality metals. The criteria for being competitive could end up only being met by those manufacturing overseas and importing items into the UK.

History has actually shown that hallmarking has boosted new business in the jewellery sector. The introduction a new hallmark in January 2010 gave instant credibility to palladium as being a bona fide previous metal for jewellery creation, resulting in increased consumer confidence and rising sales. In 2010, 107,000 palladium items were hallmarked compared to just 45,000 items towards the end of 2009.

If you feel particularly strongly that hallmarking is a valuable process in the UK, register your comments here: http://www.redtapechallenge.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/hallmarking/

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Contact Information
Bryan Douglas
Bryan Douglas
12 & 14 London Silver Vaults Chancery Lane
London, WC2A 1QS

0207405 8862