Human Rights Watch Laos today called on the Secretary-General of the United Nations who appointed the envoy to visit Laos and see the real fate of Hmong who force to return Laos .

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and UN High Commissioner for Refugees should co-operate to start dealing with the Lao Government to visit the real fate of 4500 Hmong who were returned to Laos by the Thai Government at the end of last year.
The US Congressmen could only visit a part of the settlement of the Hmong returnees in Laos. As such they could not confirm all of Hmong who were forced to return to Laos were being well treated.

Online PR News – 12-January-2010 – – UN high Commissioner for Human Rights and UN High Commissioner for Refugees should co-operate to start dealing with the Lao Government to visit the real fate of 4500 Hmong who were returned to Laos by the Thai Government at the end of last year.
UNHCR was never invited to screen the Hmong to determine their status as possible political refugees eligible for resettlement abroad. Although it has classified the 158 kept in Nongkhai as “persons of concern.”
UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Tuesday 29 December 2009 criticized Thailand ’s decision to deport the Hmong, nothing that among them were “individuals the Thai government had reportedly assessed to be in need of protection.”
“The secretary-general regrets that these deportations have taken place in the face of appeals from the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and despite the availability of third country resettlement solutions for those recognized as refugees.” the statement said.
Mr Antonio Guterres, UN High Commissioner for refugee said on 24 December 2009
“In accordance with international law, Thailand has the responsibility and international obligation to ensure that any return of recognized refugees or other persons in needs of international protection to their country of origin is undertaken on a strictly voluntary basis”.

The US Congressmen could only visit a part of the settlement of the Hmong returnees in Laos. As such they could not confirm all of Hmong who were forced to return to Laos were being well treated.

A statement was made by Mr Faleomavaega, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Asia , the Pacific and the Global Environment, US House Committee on Foreign Affairs. Mr Faleomavaega and two other congressmen, Mr Mike Honda and Mr Anh Joseph Cao, made the statement on Saturday 9 January at Vientiane after paying a visit to Phalak village in Vientiane province where the Lao government has settled about half of the illegal Lao Hmong migrants who were repatriated from Thailand last month.


Verbal of Lao PDR promised to treat the returnees ( 4500 Hmong who were forcibly repatriated from Thailand).

Lao Foreign Ministry spokesman Khenthong Nuanthasing said it is too soon for visitors but that international observers would be welcome at a late date.
"If they came right now, it would complicate the process of resettlement,” he told The Associated Press.
"But after they are settled in their permanent place, then visitors will be allowed."
The Hmong were being held in a temporary camp where an interview process was under way to determine where they want to live, he said " For those without homes, two villages have been created, and each family is eligible for a house and a plot of land." by Jocelyn Gecker, The Associated Press.
Mr Yong Chanthalangsy Ambassador of Lao PDR Permanent representative to the United Nations told USLAONC group "Lao Government gave assurance that all of Hmong are sage and healthy and will be assisted to go back to their former village soon. Three ladies delivered their babies in province hospital. All the kids will go to school” on Sunday 3 January 2010.

Canberra 13 January 2010
President Human Rights Watch Laos, Inc.
Bounkhong Arounsavat

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