DoctorsHealthPress.com Reports on Study Measuring the Effectiveness of Anti-Smoking Advertisements

The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new study that looked at the relationship between adults';

Online PR News – 22-May-2012 – Boston – The Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters, books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new study that looked at the relationship between adults' smoking behaviors and their exposure to ads sponsored by states; by private foundations; by tobacco companies themselves; or by drug companies pushing quit-smoking products.

As reported in Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin on Monday, May 21, 2012 (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/general-health-2/do-anti-smoking-commercials-work), researchers measured exposure to smoking-related advertisements on the top U.S. media markets from 1999 to 2007. They combined this data with individual smoking data and state tobacco-control-policy data. Into the mix they tossed factors like smoking status, intentions to quit smoking, attempts to quit in the past year, and average daily cigarette consumption.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article reports that the new study, found in the April issue of the "American Journal of Public Health," looked at the relationship between adults' smoking behaviors and their exposure to ads sponsored by states; by private foundations; by tobacco companies themselves; or by drug companies pushing quit-smoking products.

The researchers measured exposure to smoking-related advertisements on the top U.S. media markets from 1999 to 2007. They combined this data with individual smoking data and state tobacco-control-policy data. Into the mix they tossed factors like smoking status, intentions to quit smoking, attempts to quit in the past year, and average daily cigarette consumption.

They found less smoking and more intention to quit in markets with more state-sponsored media campaigns. Less smoking was linked to state-sponsored, private and drug company commercials. Not surprisingly, higher exposure to tobacco industry advertisements was associated with more smoking. While the cigarette company ads didn't promote the act of smoking, the effect they had was associated with more smoking -- just the line they presumably like to tiptoe across.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article also reports that the one surprise finding was that adults in areas with more ads for pharmaceutical cessation products were less likely to make an attempt to quit.

Overall, the research might indicate that it may not matter what you say to people; just that you're saying it a lot. What it shows is that anti-tobacco campaigns in the U.S. meaningfully contribute to fewer U.S. adults smoking. And that is important, because we all exist in two mutually essential groups: our individual health, and our public health overall.

(SOURCE: Emery, S., et al., "The Effects of Smoking-Related Television Advertising on Smoking and Intentions to Quit Among Adults in the United States: 19992007," American Journal of Public Health, Apr. 2012; 102(4_: 751-757.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

The Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various superfoods, like pistachios, as well as the benefits of taking vitamins and supplements, Chinese herbal remedies and homeopathy. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press' views on homeopathic healing, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/homeopathy.

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